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What Is TAI CHI?


The Chinese characters for Tai Chi Chuan can be translated as the ‘Supreme Ultimate Force’. The notion of ‘supreme ultimate’ is often associated with the Chinese concept of yin-yang, the notion that one can see a dynamic duality (male/female, active/passive, dark/light, forceful/yielding, etc.) in all things. ‘Force’ (or, more literally, ‘fist’) can be thought of here as the means or way of achieving this ying-yang, or ‘supreme-ultimate’ discipline.

Tai Chi, as it is practiced in the west today, can perhaps best be thought of as a moving form of yoga and meditation combined. There are a number of so- called forms (sometimes also called ‘sets’) which consist of a sequence of movements. Many of these movements are originally derived from the martial arts (and perhaps even more ancestrally than that, from the natural movements of animals and birds) although the way they are performed in Tai Chi is slowly, softly and gracefully with smooth and even transitions between them. For many practitioners the focus in doing them is not, first and foremost, martial, but as a meditative exercise for the body. For others the combat aspects of Tai Chi are of considerable interest.

In Chinese philosophy and medicine there exists the concept of ‘chi’, a vital force that animates the body. One of the avowed aims of Tai Chi is to foster the circulation of this ‘chi’ within the body, the belief being that by doing so the health and vitality of the person are enhanced. This ‘chi’ circulates in patterns that are close related to the nervous and vascular system and thus the notion is closely connected with that of the practice of acupuncture and other oriental healing arts. Another aim of Tai Chi is to foster a calm and tranquil mind, focused on the precise execution of these exercises. Learning to do them correctly provides a practical avenue for learning about such things as balance, alignment, fine-scale motor control, rhythm of movement, the genesis of movement from the body’s vital center, and so on.

Thus the practice of Tai Chi can in some measure contribute to being able to better stand, walk, move, run, etc. in other spheres of life as well. Many practitioners notice benefits in terms of correcting poor postural, alignment or movement patterns which can contribute to tension or injury.

Furthermore the meditative nature of the exercises is calming and relaxing in and of itself. Because the Tai Chi movements have their origins in the martial arts, practicing them does have some martial applications. In a two-person exercise called ‘push-hands’ Tai Chi principles are developed in terms of being sensitive to and responsive of another person’s ‘chi’ or vital energy. It is also an opportunity to employ some of the martial aspects of Tai Chi in a kind of slow-tempo combat. Long-time practitioners of Tai Chi who are so-inclined can become very adept at martial arts.

The emphasis in Tai Chi is on being able to channel potentially destructive energy (in the form of a kick or a punch) away from one in a manner that will dissipate the energy or send it in a direction where it is no longer a danger. The practical exercises of Tai Chi are also situated in a wider philosophical context of Taoism. This is a reflective, mystical Chinese tradition first associated with the scholar and mystic Lao Tsu, an older contemporary of Confucius. He wrote and taught in the province of Honan in the 6th century B.C. and authored the seminal work of Taoism, the Tao Te Ching.

As a philosophy, Taoism has many elements but fundamentally it espouses a calm, reflective and mystic view of the world steeped in the beauty and tranquillity of nature. Tai Chi also has, particularly amongst eastern practitioners, a long connection with the I Ching a Chinese system of divination. There are associations between the 8 basic I Ching trigrams plus the five elements of Chinese alchemy (metal, wood, fire, water and earth) with the thirteen basic postures of Tai Chi created by Chang San-feng. There are also other associations with the full 64 trigrams of the I Ching and other movements in the Tai Chi form.

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June 10, 2009 Posted by | Sport | Leave a comment

aditya-dev-fotos


There is some Photos of Aditya Dev and his family.

June 6, 2009 Posted by | Sport | Leave a comment

Meet the world’s smallest bodybuilder


At just 2ft 9in, Indian muscleman Aditya ‘Romeo’ Dev is the world’s smallest bodybuilder.

Pint-sized Romeo is well-known in his hometown of Phagwara, India – for his ability to lift 1.5kg dumbbells – despite his overall 9kg body weight.

Every day, crowds flock to the local gym to the see the mini-muscleman in training.

manliftbm_450x553Mini muscleman: Romeo, pictured with his trainer Ranjeet Pal, weighs just 1 st 6 lbs

bodybuilderbm_450x5321Muscle man Romeo shows off his moves in the gym

Unlike many dwarfs, Romeo is well proportioned, with a head circumference of 15in and a chest measurement of 20in.

Romeo said: “I’ve been training as a bodybuilder for the last two years and by now I think I must be the strongest dwarf in the world.

“I have always been fit but since I started working out, I have become famous for my strength.

“My size has never stopped me. I train with dumbbells and do aerobics and dance. People are always pleased to see me. I have been invited on TV shows and dance on stage.”

bodybuildBARHowzat: Romeo bats away any doubts about his sporting prowess prompted by his size

His trainer Ranjeet Pal spents hours helping his 19-year-old protege build his small muscles to perfection.

“Because of his small size, I don’t assign him hard exercises. But Romeo trains more or less the same as anyone else and he’s much more determined.

“When he first started, I insisted he did a month of basic exercises like aerobics, push-ups and basic gymnastics to prepare his body.

TinyDumbsBAR

Possibly the strongest dwarf in the world: Romeo and his 1.5kg dumbbells

“After that, I made lightweight dumbbells and taught him basic weight-lifting exercises to shape his biceps and triceps. His size and his weight were taken care of so that he never hurt himself.”

Determined Romeo is hoping to have an entertainment career after performing in many local TV shows.

He said: “I earn good money through my dance and bodybuilding shows but being rich doesn’t interest me.

“My dream is to travel a lot – I want to perform in London with my idol, Jazzy-B.”

Tiny2BAR

More Fotos of Aditya Dev

June 6, 2009 Posted by | Sport | 1 Comment

Capoeira


Capoeira is an Afro-Brazilian art form that makes a ritual of movements from martial arts, games, and dance. It was brought to Brazil from Angola some time after the 16th century in the regions known as Bahia, Pernambuco and Rio de Janeiro. Participants form a roda, or circle, and take turns either playing musical instruments (such as the Berimbau), singing, or ritually sparring in pairs in the center of the circle. The game is marked by fluid acrobatic play, feints, and extensive use of sweeps, kicks, and headbutts. Less frequently used techniques include elbow strikes, slaps, punches, and body throws.

Capoeira originated in Brazil, when African slaves from all over Africa, including Sudan, Angola and Mozambique, began combining traditional African dance, with fighting techniques. Capoeira was said to be a demonstration against the homogenization of African culture, a combination of cultural practices from different regions as well as a means for self protection and defense. In the late 1800s, Capoeira was made illegal, after it was suspected as a potential cause of unrest and revolution amongst slaves. After it became illegal to openly practice Capoeira, slaves began to participate in the art secretly, for fear of brutal and violent punishments.

Capoeira can be best visualized as a combination of dance, kick-boxing and karate. One of the most fundamental movements of Capoiera is the ginga. The ginga is essentially a movement of rocking back and forth and essentially sizing up your opponent. In this position, you rock back and forth from one foot to the other, with your feet squared beneath your shoulders. Generally, individuals maintain a crouched position using their feet as axes to move forward and backward and from side to side. Capoeira is very similar to break-dancing in this way.

June 5, 2009 Posted by | Sport | Leave a comment